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UK prices for morning after pill: is there an alternative?


morning after pill prices headlines

News articles over the weekend (7-8 May 2016) revealed that women in the UK are paying an astonishing five times more for the morning after pill than those in other European countries.

Experts have also expressed outrage at the hoops that must be jumped through to get the drug, calling on the government to make it available off the shelf, as well as reduce the price. Unlike in France, Scandinavia, and the United States, the pill is not available without a consultation; women are required to undergo a consultation and discuss their sex lives with a pharmacist or doctor in order to access the time-sensitive emergency contraception.

High costs and a difficult process to obtain the morning after pill have resulted in what Anne Furedi of the British Pregnancy Advisory Service calls a framework that is “insulting, expensive and does not meet women’s needs”, according to The Independent. Read in full

Non-medical preventative measures for cystitis and thrush in women

prevent thrush cystitisCystitis and thrush are not normally serious health conditions, and can be treated with relative ease. A quick round of antibiotics can clear up cystitis, while vaginal thrush can be treated with a single-dose capsule, pessaries or cream. But, anyone who suffers from recurring episodes from either of these conditions can attest that it’s never fun to feel the first pangs of an infection coming on. They can be painful, and it’s a ‘pain’ to have to locate the medicines to treat them.

Certain lifestyle changes can help stave off cystitis and thrush before they start, and if you’re a woman who is prone to one or both of them, it pays to learn more about non-medical preventative measures. Read in full

Missed a Pill? Here’s what to do

missed contraceptive pill‘The pill’ is a very effective form of contraception – but only when taken correctly! Alas it’s one of those medications that is subject to user error, and in this case missing a pill can have a profound effect on your life.

Women (and couples) in this predicament are usually searching for instant information, and luckily there are ways to take immediate measures to get back on track with the pill and prevent pregnancy.

So without further ado, here is what to do. Just keep in mind that this information is only for the combined pill. The combined pill Qlaira works slightly differently and the rules here may not apply to you. Please see the ‘patient information leaflet’ link below. Read in full

Stopping Cystitis in its tracks

treating cystitis utiIf you’re plagued by cystitis you know the symptoms all too well – the burning, stinging feeling when you pass water, the urgency to use the toilet and needing to go more frequently.

You’ve described your symptoms to a doctor and had the urinalyses, but by now you may be pretty well able to recognise the onset of cystitis yourself. Women who have cystitis time and again (also known as recurrent cystitis) tend to do their research in order to try and avoid future episodes. Read in full

Posted on in Cystitis

Side effects of Norethistrone: is period delay safe?

period delay calenbar dateWhat should you do if your period is due during your holiday at the beach? You want to be frolicking in the waves without having to worry if your tampon string is showing! You may be looking forward to a romantic weekend with your long distance love or have a sports event coming up and there’s just no way you can do it with menstrual cramps; there are a number of reasons why women want to delay their periods.

Norethistrone is a way to delay your period for up to 17 days, but as with any medication that alters your body’s natural functions it should be used with care. Read on to learn more about possible side effects and whether period delay with norethistrone right for you.

What is norethistrone?

Norethistrone closely related to the naturally occurring female hormone progesterone. It belongs to the group of medicines called progestogens. Norethistrone tablets can be used to treat painful or every heavy periods, certain female cancers, symptoms of PMS, endometriosis and other conditions. They can also be used to delay periods on special occasions. Read in full

Can I trust my contraceptive?

contraceptive failuresWe all want to trust our contraceptive but how reliable are they really? There are statistics out there but how do we interpret them?

The background level of fertility varies naturally between couples. Many forms of contraception are affected by “user reliability”. Women’s natural fertility declines from the age of 27 and men’s from age 60, so there are lots of factors to consider. Statistics often quote a figure for “consistent and correct” use (often from clinical trials) but these are often very different from “typical” use, which is a more helpful figure to most people. Read in full

Importance of annual pill checks

pill check nurse

Pill-checks – NHS requirements

Routine medical care for women taking the oral contraceptive pill includes annual check-ups with a doctor or nurse. During these check-ups, blood pressure and weight are normally measured and a cervical smear will be carried out, if it is due.

Enquiries will be made to see if the pill being taken is still the best contraception option, and whether changes need to be made, because of side effects, symptoms such as irregular or difficult periods, or simply because of increasing age. Women over 35 often prefer a mini-pill (progesterone only), and women over 35 years who smoke should not normally take a combined pill (pill containing oestrogen).

Some women are at higher risk and may need pill checks more frequently than 12 months. This applies to women with a history of high blood pressure or diabetes, women who have had previous problems with the pill and women with co-existing medical problems. Read in full

DIY health-check guide

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A trip to the doctors is a task many people will put off. Whether it’s a fear of potential embarrassment, reluctance to take time off work, or the worry that something could be seriously wrong, going to your GP is often bottom of your to-do list.

But everyone needs a health MOT every now and then, and as you get older, this becomes even more important.

There are several online health checks, which you can do in the comfort of your own home and will give you a good idea on how your body is doing. Your body will nearly always give clear warning signs if something is wrong, so it’s up to you to listen to them.

Although these tests should not replace a trip to the doctors, they allow you to test your health more regularly and spot potential problems more quickly.
Read in full