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How one doctor recommends a contraceptive pill

Photo of boxes of different brands of contraceptive pillsIn the UK, nearly a quarter of women aged 16–49 are regular pill users – it’s a popular form of contraception.

There are many pills available and all are very effective. Combined oral contraceptive (COC) pills are over 99% effective and the progesterone only pill (POP) or ‘mini pill‘ is 97% effective – so which one is right for you?

My first consideration is one of practicality. Pills must be taken regularly. For those who work shifts, live between more than one place, are chaotic or prone to forgetfulness, the pill may not be reliable. The COC has more leeway regards missed pills as well as being more effective than the POP, so is usually chosen unless there are specific reasons not to. Read in full

UK prices for morning after pill: is there an alternative?


morning after pill prices headlines

News articles over the weekend (7-8 May 2016) revealed that women in the UK are paying an astonishing five times more for the morning after pill than those in other European countries.

Experts have also expressed outrage at the hoops that must be jumped through to get the drug, calling on the government to make it available off the shelf, as well as reduce the price. Unlike in France, Scandinavia, and the United States, the pill is not available without a consultation; women are required to undergo a consultation and discuss their sex lives with a pharmacist or doctor in order to access the time-sensitive emergency contraception.

High costs and a difficult process to obtain the morning after pill have resulted in what Anne Furedi of the British Pregnancy Advisory Service calls a framework that is “insulting, expensive and does not meet women’s needs”, according to The Independent. Read in full

Non-medical preventative measures for cystitis and thrush in women

prevent thrush cystitisCystitis and thrush are not normally serious health conditions, and can be treated with relative ease. A quick round of antibiotics can clear up cystitis, while vaginal thrush can be treated with a single-dose capsule, pessaries or cream. But, anyone who suffers from recurring episodes from either of these conditions can attest that it’s never fun to feel the first pangs of an infection coming on. They can be painful, and it’s a ‘pain’ to have to locate the medicines to treat them.

Certain lifestyle changes can help stave off cystitis and thrush before they start, and if you’re a woman who is prone to one or both of them, it pays to learn more about non-medical preventative measures. Read in full

Why women lose their hair (and what you can do about it)

hair loss in womenHair loss can occur in a number of ways. It may become apparent by a gradual thinning of the hair, with the scalp becoming more and more visible, or it can happen more dramatically, with clumps of hair falling out and bald patches appearing almost instantly.

In men, hair loss can often be attributed to the natural ageing process and is not often cause for alarm. And though it can have significant effects on men’s emotional state of mind, the effects can (arguably) be even more difficult when hair loss occurs in women.

Not only is it alarming to see one of your most prominent features disappearing, you also have to deal with a condition that is often seen as a male issue. There is a social stigma involved, and emotional repercussions, like low self-esteem, that must be addressed. But what is responsible for hair loss in women? Read in full

Missed a Pill? Here’s what to do

missed contraceptive pill‘The pill’ is a very effective form of contraception – but only when taken correctly! Alas it’s one of those medications that is subject to user error, and in this case missing a pill can have a profound effect on your life.

Women (and couples) in this predicament are usually searching for instant information, and luckily there are ways to take immediate measures to get back on track with the pill and prevent pregnancy.

So without further ado, here is what to do. Just keep in mind that this information is only for the combined pill. The combined pill Qlaira works slightly differently and the rules here may not apply to you. Please see the ‘patient information leaflet’ link below. Read in full

Stopping Cystitis in its tracks

treating cystitis utiIf you’re plagued by cystitis you know the symptoms all too well – the burning, stinging feeling when you pass water, the urgency to use the toilet and needing to go more frequently.

You’ve described your symptoms to a doctor and had the urinalyses, but by now you may be pretty well able to recognise the onset of cystitis yourself. Women who have cystitis time and again (also known as recurrent cystitis) tend to do their research in order to try and avoid future episodes. Read in full

Posted on in Cystitis

Side effects of Norethistrone: is period delay safe?

period delay calenbar dateWhat should you do if your period is due during your holiday at the beach? You want to be frolicking in the waves without having to worry if your tampon string is showing! You may be looking forward to a romantic weekend with your long distance love or have a sports event coming up and there’s just no way you can do it with menstrual cramps; there are a number of reasons why women want to delay their periods.

Norethistrone is a way to delay your period for up to 17 days, but as with any medication that alters your body’s natural functions it should be used with care. Read on to learn more about possible side effects and whether period delay with norethistrone right for you.

What is norethistrone?

Norethistrone closely related to the naturally occurring female hormone progesterone. It belongs to the group of medicines called progestogens. Norethistrone tablets can be used to treat painful or every heavy periods, certain female cancers, symptoms of PMS, endometriosis and other conditions. They can also be used to delay periods on special occasions. Read in full