Help Beat Cancer – Grow a Moustache for Movember

mo-gro movemberMovember is the annual, month-long event that runs from 1st November to raise awareness for testicular and prostate cancer.  The charity’s ultimate goal is to ‘change the face of men’s health’ in a humorous yet powerful way. Check out Dr Fox’s Mo-Gro Tonic and show your support.

Prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer for men in the UK. One in eight men will be diagnosed with it in their lifetime, with the average age of diagnosis being 70-74 years. Often difficult to spot because of its lack of symptoms, current diagnostic tests are poor.

Testicular cancer

Testicular cancer is rarer, affecting around 2,200 men in the UK each year. Most common in men between the age of 15 and 45, if caught early it’s easy to treat, with a 96% cure rate.

The rise of Movember

Set up in 2003 in Australia and New Zealand, the purpose of Movember is to raise awareness and to increase the early detection, diagnosis and treatment of the most common and deadly cancers affecting men. It also aims to encourage men to have annual check-ups and adopt a healthier lifestyle.

In the last decade, the event has increased exponentially to become a truly global phenomenon. In 2007, events were launched in Canada, Ireland, Czech Republic, Denmark, El Salvador, Spain, Israel, South Africa, Taiwan, United States and the UK – and there are plenty of other countries enthusiastically following suit.

And women can get involved too – signing up and providing support and encouragement for the men taking part.

How does Movember help to fight cancer?

Proceeds from the event are disseminated to various cancer charities across the world, including the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia, the Prostate Cancer Foundation, the Irish Cancer Society, and Prostate Cancer UK.

The money raised goes towards programmes supporting prostate and testicular cancer initiatives. It helps to raise awareness, educate, promote new research, and provide a vital network of support for people living with cancer.

This is a vital, life-saving campaign, and the more men that are aware of the symptoms and effects of cancer, the better.  And not only does the campaign aim for men to be better informed, but it encourages men to pay few more visits to the doctors too – and most men will be thankful of that.

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